NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL WASHINGTON, D.C. and NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD UNION

United States of America

BEFORE THE FEDERAL SERVICE IMPASSES PANEL

 

In the Matter of

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD

OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL

WASHINGTON, D.C.

 

 

 

 

 

Case No. 00 FSIP 63

and

NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD

UNION

 

DECISION AND ORDER

    The National Labor Relations Board Union (Union) filed a request for assistance with the Federal Service Impasses Panel (Panel) to consider a negotiation impasse under the Federal Service Labor-Management Relations Statute (Statute), 5 U.S.C. § 7119, between it and the National Labor Relations Board, Office of General Counsel, Washington, D.C. (Employer).(1)

    Following investigation of the request for assistance, the Panel determined that the dispute, which involves ground rules for two successor collective bargaining agreements (CBA), should be resolved on the basis of single written submissions from the parties, with the Panel limited to selecting between the parties’ final offers. Written submissions were received pursuant to this procedure, and the Panel has now considered the entire record.

BACKGROUND

    The Employer administers provisions of the National Labor Relations Act, which vests it with the authority to, among other things, prosecute complaints in unfair labor practice cases and resolve questions of representation involving private sector employers and unions. The Union represents 1,126 bargaining-unit employees in three different bargaining units. Regarding the two affected units, one consists of 690 professional employees in occupations such as attorney and investigator, at grades GS-5 through -14; the second consists of 291 support employees in positions such as computer assistant or specialist, reader, language assistant or clerk, office manager, and assistant office manager at grades GS-5 through -9.(2) The two CBAs expired on February 29, 2000, but their terms continue by agreement of the parties.

ISSUE AT IMPASSE

    The sole issue in dispute is the amount of money the Employer should contribute towards the travel and per diem expenses of four of the Union’s five-member bargaining team during successor CBA negotiations.(3)

POSITIONS OF THE PARTIES

1. The Employer’s Position

    The Employer proposes to pay $20,000 toward the travel and per diem expenses of four Union bargaining team members to attend negotiating sessions to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio, and Washington, D.C., respectively. This amount covers 53 percent of the $37,696 the Union will spend on travel to the four bargaining sessions.(4) The proposal "is both fair and reasonable, especially in light of the fact that the Agency will incur significant additional expenses . . . in connection with the Cincinnati bargaining" where there are fewer resources and less equipment.(5) With respect to the proportion of all bargaining costs, the Employer’s proposal will cover a total of 76 percent of these in contrast to the Union’s proposal, which would require the Employer to cover a total of 86 percent or $71,560. From this perspective, "[a]llowing the Union to pay less than 15 percent of the total costs . . . does not provide a sufficient financial incentive for the Union to move toward agreement in a timely manner." In resolving the parties’ previous ground rules dispute, the Panel required the Employer to pay $30,000, which amounted to 55 percent of the Union’s travel and per diem expenses.(6) While the Employer’s current proposal is comparable (this time it represents 53 percent), the Union’s "would result in the Agency paying nearly 75 percent" of these expenses. With cash assets in excess of $213,000, as disclosed by the Union in its annual financial report to the Department of Labor, it can well afford to cover such costs. For these reasons, the Union should be required to assume a larger share of its own expenses than was imposed by the Panel in resolving the parties’ previous dispute.

2. The Union’s Position

    The Union proposes that the Employer "pay a maximum of $28,000 toward the Union’s travel and per diem expenses in connection with successor agreement negotiations." This would require the Union to pay approximately 30 percent of an estimated $40,004 in travel-related costs.(7) The Union’s share represents "a significant amount" considering that the Union, "a small unaffiliated organization," must also pay for the following items: $12,000 for 12 days of mediation; 50 percent of the facilitator’s charges for the two Washington, D.C., sessions; and costs associated with any Panel impasse procedures, additional bargaining sessions, preparation meetings (several thousand has already been spent on this item), and implementation briefings. In this regard, "any argument by the Agency that it is paying a large percentage of the Union’s costs is simply not accurate as it fails to take into account the Union’s actual expenses." Requiring the Union to pay a larger share could affect its ability to engage in collective bargaining and other representational activities.

    The Union’s proposal is $2,000 less than the $30,000 cap the Panel adopted in NLRB and NLRBU 7 years ago. The difference takes into account both that: (1) in 1993, travel monies were to cover five Union negotiators; and (2) since 1993, as reflected in General Services Administration’s travel allowances, hotel and incidental travel costs have increased by 25 percent. Furthermore, the Employer’s ability to cover such costs has improved as "this year’s budget is better than it has been in years." Regarding extra costs related to the second location, the Employer was initially opposed and offered to pay $35,000 if the Union would have agreed to meet only in Washington, D.C. Conducting some ses