47:0621(56)AR - - Air Force Logistics Command, Hill AFB, UT and AFGE, Local 1592 - - 1993 FLRAdec AR - - v47 p621



[ v47 p621 ]
47:0621(56)AR
The decision of the Authority follows:


47 FLRA No. 56

FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY

WASHINGTON, D.C.

_____

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE

AIR FORCE LOGISTICS COMMAND

HILL AIR FORCE BASE, UTAH

(Agency)

and

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES

LOCAL 1592

(Union)

0-AR-2367

_____

DECISION

May 13, 1993

_____

Before Chairman McKee and Members Talkin and Armendariz.

I. Statement of the Case

This matter is before the Authority on an exception to an award of Arbitrator Daniel M. Winograd filed by the Union under section 7122(a) of the Federal Service Labor-Management Relations Statute (the Statute) and part 2425 of the Authority's Rules and Regulations. The Agency did not file an opposition to the Union's exception.

The Arbitrator overturned the suspension of the grievant for insubordination because he found that she had not been insubordinate. However, he ordered the grievant reprimanded because he found that, by her actions, she was discourteous and failed to perform assigned work in a timely fashion.

We conclude that the Union fails to establish that the award is deficient. Accordingly, we will deny the Union's exception.

II. Background and Arbitrator's Award

The Agency charged that the grievant had engaged in acts of insubordination to her supervisor on three occasions on May 18 and 19, 1992, and suspended the grievant for 3 days. The grievant filed a grievance over the suspension. The grievance was not resolved and was submitted to arbitration on the issue of whether the suspension for insubordination was for just cause.

The Arbitrator noted that the offense of insubordination has been defined by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit as a willful and intentional refusal to obey an authorized order of a superior, which order the superior is entitled to have obeyed. Award at 10 (citing Phillips v. GSA, 878 F.2d 370 (Fed. Cir. 1989)). The Arbitrator determined that at no time during the specified occasions did the grievant refuse to follow an order of her supervisor. He found that the grievant was less than fully cooperative and helpful and that she acted in a manner calculated to cause inconvenience to her supervisor, but he concluded that she was not guilty of insubordination. Consequently, he ruled that she should not have been suspended. However, he also ruled that, by her actions on the specified occasions, the grievant was guilty of two offenses set forth in Air Force Regulation (AFR) 40-750. He found that she was guilty of discourteous conduct and a failure to perform assigned work in a timely fashion, for which he determined that a reprimand was an appropriate penalty for these offenses under AFR 40-750.

Accordingly, as the award, the Arbitrator sustained the grievance, in part. He ordered the grievant made whole for the pay and benefits that she lost as a result of the unjustified suspension. He further ordered that all records be amended to reflect a reprimand of the grievant for discourteous conduct and for a failure to perform assigned work in a timely fashion.

III. Exception

The Union contends that the award is deficient because the Arbitrator sustained discipline against the grievant based on grounds different from the charge relied on by the Agency in suspending the grievant for 3 days. The Union asserts that, by ordering the grievant reprimanded for discourteous conduct and failing to perform assigned work in a timely fashion when she was charged with insubordination, the award violates 5 U.S.C. §§ 7501-7504 and the grievant's constitutional right to due process of law.

The Union maintains that if this were a serious adverse action case under 5 U.S.C. § 7512 before the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB), the outcome would not be in doubt. The Union notes that both the MSPB and the Federal Circuit have clearly stated that a disciplinary action against an employee may not be sustained on the basis of a charge that could have been brought against the employee, but was not. As support, the Union cites Johnston v. GPO, 5 MSPR 354 (1981) and Burroughs v. Department of the Army, 918 F.2d 170 (Fed. Cir. 1990). The Union also notes that Federal Personnel Manual (FPM) chapter 752, subchapter 2 precludes agencies from disciplining employees for reasons not stated in notices of proposed action. The Union argues that the result should be the same in cases such as this one involving suspensions of 14 days or less because the result is grounded on fundamental considerations of due process.

IV. Analysis and Conclusions

We find that, in contending that the award is deficient, the Union misconstrues the award by focusing on the grievant's suspension by the Agency. The Arbitrator has not ordered the grievant suspended. Rather, the Arbitrator vacated the 3-day suspension of the grievant and ordered the grievant made whole for the pay and benefits that she lost as a result of the unjustified suspension. Accordingly, the question we must resolve is whether the Union establishes that the award ordering a reprimand of the grievant is deficient. We conclude that the Union provides no basis for finding the award deficient.

We find no basis for finding that the award is contrary to 5 U.S.C. §§ 7501-7504. By their own terms, these provisions apply only to suspensions of 14 days or less. They do not apply to reprimands. Because the grievant's suspension was vacated by the Arbitrator and the grievant was made whole, we reject the Union's reliance on the procedural protections of sections 7501-7504 in contending that the reprimand ordered by the grievant is contrary to law. We similarly reject the Union's reliance on decisions of the MSPB and the Federal Circuit and FPM chapter 752. As the Union concedes, the cited decisions dealt with adverse actions covered by section 7512. By its own terms, section 7512 does not apply to reprimands. Similarly, FPM chapter 752, subchapter 2 addresses only suspensions for 14 days or less and does not apply to reprimands. Accordingly, the cited decisions and FPM chapter 752 provide no basis on which to find the award deficient.

We also find no basis for finding that the award violates the grievant's constitutional right to due process of law. As we recognized in U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific and International Association of Machi