51:1302(107)AR - - AFGE, Local 1770 and Army, HQ, XVIII Airborne Corps and Fort Bragg, Fort Bragg, NC - - 1996 FLRAdec AR - - v51 p1302



[ v51 p1302 ]
51:1302(107)AR
The decision of the Authority follows:


51 FLRA No. 107

FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY

WASHINGTON, D.C.

_____

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES

LOCAL 1770

(Union)

and

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

HEADQUARTERS, XVIII AIRBORNE CORPS

AND FORT BRAGG

FORT BRAGG, NORTH CAROLINA

(Agency)

0-AR-2719

_____

DECISION

May 31, 1996

_____

Before the Authority: Phyllis N. Segal, Chair; Tony Armendariz and Donald S. Wasserman, Members.

I. Statement of the Case

This matter is before the Authority on exceptions to an award of Arbitrator C. Allen Foster filed by the Union under section 7122(a) of the Federal Service Labor-Management Relations Statute (the Statute) and part 2425 of the Authority's Regulations. The Agency filed an opposition to the Union's exceptions.

The grievance challenged the Agency's 10-day suspension of the grievant for the offenses of insubordination, creating a disturbance and threatening bodily harm. Although he found that it was appropriate for the Agency to discipline the grievant for those offenses, the Arbitrator reduced the discipline to a 5-day suspension.

We conclude that the Union's exceptions fail to establish that the award is deficient under section 7122(a) of the Statute. Accordingly, we deny the exceptions.

II. Background and Arbitrator's Award

The grievant was administered an "on-the-spot correction" by a noncommissioned officer (NCO). Award at 2, 10. In response, the grievant loudly challenged the NCO as to his authority to administer that correction. When the grievant and the NCO met with the grievant's supervisor over the dispute, the grievant demanded that the NCO be removed from the room or "something might happen to him." Id. at 12.

The Agency suspended the grievant for 10 days as a result of his conduct in response to the correction. A grievance was filed over the suspension and when it was not resolved, it was submitted to arbitration on the following stipulated issues:

[W]hether Management can show by a preponderance of the evidence that [the grievant] was insubordinate, created a disturbance, and threatened bodily harm without physical contact on or about 4 January 1994, and whether the ten-day suspension imposed upon [the grievant] was consistent with the Agency table of penalties for the charged misconduct.

Id. at 2.

The Arbitrator determined that the NCO had authority to administer the correction. He also concluded that the grievant admitted in testimony that he had engaged in behavior that had been disruptive to the workplace and had implicitly threatened the NCO. As a result, he concluded that it was appropriate to discipline the grievant. However, he found mitigating circumstances for the employee's misconduct and reduced the 10-day suspension to 5 days.

III. Exceptions

A. Union's Exceptions

The Union argues that, at step 3 of the grievance procedure, the Agency's deciding official stated that it would be "inappropriate" to suspend the grievant for "insubordination and causing disruption . . . ." Exceptions at 2.(*) Based on this alleged statement, the Union contends that the Arbitrator erred in determining that the grievant could be disciplined for the offense of creating a disturbance. The Union also argues that the Arbitrator failed to find that there had been a loss of production, which it claims is a requirement for the offense of creating a disturbance under the Agency's table of penalties. The Union further argues that the Arbitrator failed to consider the evidentiary factors set forth in Metz v. Department of Treasury, 780 F.2d 1001 (Fed. Cir. 1986) (Metz) for deciding whether a statement constitutes a threat. The Union asserts that, in making such a determination, the Authority considers factors similar to those set forth in Metz. In support, the Union cites Internal Revenue Service, Headquarters and Internal Revenue Service, Detroit District, Detroit, Michigan and National Treasury Employees Union and National Treasury Employees Union, Chapter 24, 40 FLRA 469 (1991) (NTEU) and Overseas Education Association and Joseph Cardone, 15 FLRA 488 (1984) (Cardone).

B. Agency's Opposition

The Agency disputes the Union's argument that it decided at step 3 of the grievance procedure that discipline for the offense of creating a disturbance was unwarranted. The Agency also asserts that the Arbitrator: (1) rejected the Union's argument that the offense of creating a disturbance requires a finding of a loss of production; and (2) considered the evidentiary factors set forth in Metz in deciding whether the statement constituted a threat.

IV. Analysis and Conclusions

A. The Arbitrator Did Not Exceed His Authority

We construe the Union's argument that the Arbitrator erred in considering whether the grievant could be disciplined for creating a disturbance as an assertion that the Arbitrator exceeded his authority by resolving an issue that was not submitted to arbitration. An arbitrator exceeds his or her authority when the arbitrator fails to resolve an issue submitted to arbitration, resolves an issue not submitted to arbitration, disregards specific limitations on his or her authority, or awards relief to persons who are not encompassed within the grievance. See U.S. Department of the Navy, Naval Base, Norfolk, Virginia and American Federation of Government Employees, Local 22, 51 FLRA 305, 307-08 (1995); U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Logistics Agency and American Federation of Government Employees, Local 2693, 50 FLRA 212, 217 (1995).

In this case, the Arbitrator stated that the parties had agreed that the dispute before him involved, among other things, the issues of whether the grievant had created a disturbance and whether the 10-day suspension of the grievant was consistent with the Agency's table of penalties for the charged misconduct. The Arbitrat