File 2: Opinion of Chairman Cabaniss

[ v60 p386 ]


Chairman Cabaniss, dissenting in part:

      I write separately in dissent on the negotiability determination regarding the second sentence of Proposal 14(f). I disagree with my colleagues as to their interpretation of the law regarding the negotiability of the proposal.

      As to the negotiability of the second sentence of Proposal 14(f), I believe that the majority misinterprets our precedent by finding that the right to determine internal security only includes the right to prevent the disclosure of confidential and privileged information. See Majority at 35. Our precedent holds that the right to determine internal security practices encompasses an agency's right to determine the nature and extent of the information concerning an internal investigation which it will disclose and to whom it will disclose that information, irrelevant of whether the information is confidential or privileged. Local 1738, 27 FLRA at 55-56 (citing Local 1300, 18 FLRA at 795-97).

      The Authority's early cases regarding disclosure of information concerning investigations relied on the "disclosure of privileged and confidential information." AFGE, AFL-CIO, Nat'l Immigration & Naturalization Serv. Council, 8 FLRA 347, 363 (1982) (proposal giving the union the right to maintain recordings and transcripts of employee interviews concerning investigations inconsistent with the right to determine internal security practices because it would deny the agency its right to prevent the disclosure of confidential and privileged information); NTEU, 7 FLRA 275, 275-77 (1981) (proposal giving union officials clearance to enter all work areas inconsistent with the right to determine internal security practices because it would negate the agency's practice of restricting access so as to prevent the unauthorized disclosure of information; NLRBU, 5 FLRA at 696-97 (proposal allowing union officials and employees to photocopy agency records regarding investigations inconsistent with the right to determine internal security practices because it would give the union access to privileged and confidential materials).

      The Authority subsequently modified that precedent and stated "it is irrelevant what information concerning [an] investigation management is required to disclose" and that management's right to determine its internal security practices encompassed the right to determine the "nature and extent of the information concerning an investigation which it will disclose, and to whom it will disclose that information[.]" Local 1300, 18 FLRA at 796-97. See also Local 1738, 27 FLRA at 55-56 (citing Local 1300, the Authority stated that "management's right under section 7106(a)(1) to determine its internal security practices included the right to determine the nature and extent of the information concerning an investigation which it would disclose, and to whom it would disclose that information" and resolved the case without reference to the confidential or privileged nature of the information sought); NTEU, 55 FLRA 1174, 1184 (1999) (The Authority affirmed an ALJ decision where the ALJ, citing Local 1738 and Local 1300, stated that an agency's right to determine its internal security practice included the right to "determine the nature and extent of the information concerning an investigation that it would disclose, and to whom it would disclose that information[,]" without reference to the privileged or confidential nature of the information sought.)

      My colleagues state that although the Authority, in Local 1300, announced that the type of information to be disclosed is irrelevant, that case and subsequent cases emphasized the confidential and privileged nature of the information to be disclosed. Majority at 35-36, n.10. The majority explains that in Local 1300, the Authority stated that it has held that "rules and policies pertaining to the disclosure of privileged and confidential information constitute internal security practices within the discretion of management to determine under section 7106(a)(1)." See id. Indeed the Authority did make such a statement, but the majority fails to explain that the Authority did so in the context of explaining its precedent. After setting forth its precedent, the Authority ultimately modified that precedent to include the disclosure of any information regarding internal investigations. I base this conclusion on the Authority's statement that "it is irrelevant what information concerning the investigation management is required to disclose . . . the right to determine the nature and extent of the information concerning an investigation which it will disclose . . . is reserved to management under the Statute." Local 1300, 18 FLRA at 796-97. In addition, in addressing the specific proposal in Local 1300, the Authority stated, "as Section (b) of the [u]nion's proposal would prescribe the conditions under which such information must be disclosed, it directly interferes with management's right to determine the [a]gency's internal security practices and is outside the duty to bargain[.]" See id. at 797. Nothing in the actual determination of that case mentions or emphasizes the privileged and confidential nature of the information the union was requesting.

      The majority also relies on Local 2050, for the proposition that an agency's right to determine internal security includes the right to "prevent improper or unauthorized disclosure of privileged or confidential information[.]" [ v60 p387 ] Majority at 35 (citing Local 2050, 36 FLRA at 639). This case does not support the majority's decision. In Local 2050, the Authority failed to fully articulate the standard set out in NTEU, Chapter 153, 21 FLRA 841, on which it relied, when it stated, "[a]n agency's right to determine its internal security practices also includes management action to prevent improper or unauthorized disclosure of privileged or confidential information[.]" [n1] Local 2050, 36 FLRA at 639 (emphasis added). In Chapter 153, the proposal required the agency to provide the union with a summary of allegations regarding non-criminal matters obtained through an agency hotline and did not require the agency to disclose any information regarding an internal investigation. Chapter 153, 21 FLRA at 842. In determining that the proposal was within the duty to bargain, the Authority stated, "[u]nder [the proposal] the [a]gency retains the discretion to determine the timing of the release and the nature of the information that will be disclosed as well as the right to take any action necessary to protect confidential information or sources." Id. at 847. Through the use of "as well as" the Authority clearly sets forth two separate rights - the right to deter